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lorca-the-great:

After not winning anything at the cosplay pagent at GaymerX2 (bullshit) I undertook the task of putting my Garrett cosplay on my mannequin.

So HERE have some epic detail shots!

(via art-and-sterf)

dogsdontbegforpaychecks said: I've been wanting to make some beanbag kind of plushies for a while.. They'd just be completely round, but not exactly a sphere? Do you have any tips (I can sew; I make hats and stuff.. just have never done something like this)?

laniblob:

sure! it’s pretty easy.

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these are some simple patterns you could potentially use (the first one showing the one that will give you a complete sphere). i’ve never made a hat but the last one seems like it may be similar to making one, only giving it a bottom. there are ways to do this without using so many pieces (ie darting) but i haven’t really ventured into that yet.

here’s something i made years ago using the middle pattern, 5 pieces.

captain-harrie:

cinnamonfritterderps:

captain-harrie:

OKAY SO
Centre of gravity.

If your character is just standing there, regardless as to what their posture is like, the centre of gravity should fall (as the name suggests) through the centre of their body!

On here I’ve shown the centre of gravity as a split between two colours to make it easier to see the mass on both sides.

In the middle there is a lil charmander running, and because he’s in motion there is more mass on one side - the direction he is heading in has more weight pushing him in that direction

and at the bottom, no matter how far forwards your character is leaning, the mass still needs to be equal so they dont fall over!!

It is possible to be in poses where the center of gravity is outside of the body, but as long as the base (whatever feet are currently on the ground and the space between them) is directly below the center of gravity, the pose is stable

I’m not sure what you’re trying to say! The whole thing represents where your weight is in relation to where your supporting appendage is in contact with the ground.

If there is too much weight on one side, you will overbalance and stumble or fall over. What I was trying to convey here was that - unless in motion - the centre of gravity needs to be in the centre or your character will be unbalanced.

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(via art-and-sterf)

artrubzow:

If you cant attend life drawing sessions. This is the best thing for you

Let me show you something I recently found : Croquis Cafe!

You get to see models of different colors and shapes in a life drawing setting. They move and breath while posing (breathing like in real life :O) ambient music is playing in the background and you have 1, 2  and 5 minute sessions. I find it very helpful , you should try it.

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(via art-and-sterf)

Describing Skin Colors

thewritershelpers:

Having trouble finding synonyms for ‘white’, ‘black’, ‘tan’, etc? Have any clear idea what tone you’re going for? Here’s some web pages for skin tone description and references:

Words Used To Describe Skin Color

Handy Words for Skin Tone (Includes palettes and comparisons)

Describing Characters of Color

More Tone Synonyms w/ Pictures

7 Offensive Mistakes Writers Make (includes more than just skin color)

(Source: thewritershelpersdeactivated, via characterandwritinghelp)

amazinginterior:

New Post has been published on http://www.amazinginteriordesign.com/make-cute-sock-dragon-kids/

Make This Cute Sock Dragon for Your Kids

Images via:  craft passion 
To make this sock dragon you will require two pairs of socks. The first will be in a single color like the orange pair above and the second will be striped. Take the first colored sock and place it over the striped sock in the way shown. Mark it as explained in the photo. Also mark a line on the striped sock. Draw the spikes and wings on the striped socks leaving the part to be used for belly. Then draw the arms and feet on the second colored sock using  this template. 
 Sew the striped piece for belly to the body. Sew the body, spikes, arms, feet and wings leaving a bit opened to make them inside out. Then bring all the pieces inside out and stuff them. Detail the face of the dragon.
 Also sew the spikes to it. Sew yellow patches to the feet and attach the wings. Also make a tongue with red felt and attach that too.
 A cute sock dragon is ready for your kids. If you want further details view the comprehensive tutorial at  Craft Passion.

amazinginterior:

New Post has been published on http://www.amazinginteriordesign.com/make-cute-sock-dragon-kids/

Make This Cute Sock Dragon for Your Kids

a

Images via: craft passion

To make this sock dragon you will require two pairs of socks. The first will be in a single color like the orange pair above and the second will be striped. Take the first colored sock and place it over the striped sock in the way shown. Mark it as explained in the photo. Also mark a line on the striped sock. Draw the spikes and wings on the striped socks leaving the part to be used for belly. Then draw the arms and feet on the second colored sock using this template.

b
Sew the striped piece for belly to the body. Sew the body, spikes, arms, feet and wings leaving a bit opened to make them inside out. Then bring all the pieces inside out and stuff them. Detail the face of the dragon.

c
Also sew the spikes to it. Sew yellow patches to the feet and attach the wings. Also make a tongue with red felt and attach that too.

d
A cute sock dragon is ready for your kids. If you want further details view the comprehensive tutorial at Craft Passion.

(via art-and-sterf)

pixieplushies:

The BMO sewing pattern to make the plush is now live on my etsy store :3

pixieplushies:

The BMO sewing pattern to make the plush is now live on my etsy store :3

beezeeart:

Not to be outdone, the white “jelly blob thing” is also quite pretty.

This, as well as the blue and pink jellies, and the pattern to make them is available on etsy.

build-a-diy:

8-foot giant squid pillow.
You’ll need:
2 yards of felt
1 yard of patterned fabric (I suggest a polka dot-type pattern so it looks like suction cups)
1 medium piece of black felt, 1 medium piece of white felt (for the eyes)
white thread, black thread and thread of the same color as the felt you’re using
pins
about 5 lbs. of stuffing
a couple big sheets of paper to draw your pattern
You can find many of these things down at the many places on Fabric Row, on 4th Street between Bainbridge and Catherine. Pearl, at 417 South Street, sometimes has stuffing if you can’t find any.
First, you need to draw out your patterns. Here’s a basic template to get you started, although most of the measurements are reasonably fudgeable. If in the likely event you don’t have any four-foot-long pieces of paper lying around, just tape a few pieces together.


Once you’ve drawn out your eight patterns, it’s time to cut the fabric. Pin the pattern to the fabric, laid flat, and cut out the following, leaving a half an inch or so of extra fabric around the edge of the pattern:
FOR THE ARMS: 8 felt and 8 fabric cutouts of piece 1
FOR THE, UH, LONGER ARMS: 2 felt and 2 fabric cutouts of piece 2
FOR THE BODY: 2 felt cutouts of piece 3
FOR THE FIN: 4 felt cutouts of piece 4
FOR THE HEAD: 1 felt cutouts of piece 6
FOR THE EYES: 2 white felt cutouts of piece 7 and 2 black felt cutouts of piece 8
So now you’ve got all your pieces ready, it’s time to start sewing them together. I did mine by hand because my sewing machine is busted and I get a kind of Zen buzz from sewing by hand, but if you have a non-busted one I recommend that you use it as it will be MUCH EASIER. You’re going to be sewing everything with the nice side of the fabric facing in, then turning it inside out to stuff it.
THE ARMS: (To make a quilted pattern that looks like suckers, see this other post). Pin together one patterned fabric piece 1 and one felt piece 1 (with the nice sides facing the inside). Sew down around the U-shape and back up, leaving the top open. Then turn the arm inside out, stuff it (it’s easiest to do both of these things if you sort of scrunch it up like you’re trying to put on a pair of tights, excuse the non-dude-friendly reference) and sew the top closed. Do the same for the other seven arms and rejoice in the fact that this is the most tedious part. Same deal with the two long arms, they’re just harder to stuff.
THE FINS: Pin together two of your piece 4s and sew together the curvy outer edge. Turn the piece inside out, so the seam you just sewed is on the inside, and start sewing up the other side, stuffing gradually as you go along. You should end up with a triangle-ish puffy thing. Repeat for the other two piece 4s.

THE BODY: Put down one piece 3, then place the two fins you have down with the point up and the curvy side pointing in, then make a sandwich by putting the other piece 3 down on top. Pin it all together and sew around the edges with the two fins still inside, as shown. Turn it inside out and move on to…

THE HEAD: So take piece 6 and the ten arms you’ve already done. Lay the arms, fabric side facing you, out with the arms’ top seams in a line half an inch from the top of piece 6. The order should be arm arm arm arm BIG ARM arm arm arm arm BIG ARM. The legs should be almost entirely covering piece 6. Pin them in place and sew a straight line through the individual legs seams to attach the legs to piece 6.
When you pick up the other side of piece 6, you now have something resembling a really weird untied hula skirt. Sew together the two 9-inch ends of piece 6 with the fabric side of the arms on the outside, and keep it inside out for the moment.
PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: Fit the open end of the body through the arms (still fabric side facing out) and pull the edge all the way through the felt cylinder so it’s even with the edge that DOESN’T have arms attached to it. Sew around the diameters of the head cylinder and the body cylinder to attach them, then pull the legs down over the head and you’re almost done!
Stuff the body, then seal it off by sewing piece 5 over the open end (even if you do have a functional sewing machine, you’ll probably have to do this part by hand).
THE EYES: Sew the black circles on the white circles and whipstitch the eyes onto the head. You do this last because you can’t tell where they’re going to end up on the end product if you put them on before stuffing the body.

build-a-diy:

8-foot giant squid pillow.

You’ll need:

  • 2 yards of felt
  • 1 yard of patterned fabric (I suggest a polka dot-type pattern so it looks like suction cups)
  • 1 medium piece of black felt, 1 medium piece of white felt (for the eyes)
  • white thread, black thread and thread of the same color as the felt you’re using
  • pins
  • about 5 lbs. of stuffing
  • a couple big sheets of paper to draw your pattern

You can find many of these things down at the many places on Fabric Row, on 4th Street between Bainbridge and Catherine. Pearl, at 417 South Street, sometimes has stuffing if you can’t find any.

First, you need to draw out your patterns. Here’s a basic template to get you started, although most of the measurements are reasonably fudgeable. If in the likely event you don’t have any four-foot-long pieces of paper lying around, just tape a few pieces together.

giant squid plushie pattern

These aren't to scale.

Once you’ve drawn out your eight patterns, it’s time to cut the fabric. Pin the pattern to the fabric, laid flat, and cut out the following, leaving a half an inch or so of extra fabric around the edge of the pattern:

FOR THE ARMS: 8 felt and 8 fabric cutouts of piece 1

FOR THE, UH, LONGER ARMS: 2 felt and 2 fabric cutouts of piece 2

FOR THE BODY: 2 felt cutouts of piece 3

FOR THE FIN: 4 felt cutouts of piece 4

FOR THE HEAD: 1 felt cutouts of piece 6

FOR THE EYES: 2 white felt cutouts of piece 7 and 2 black felt cutouts of piece 8

So now you’ve got all your pieces ready, it’s time to start sewing them together. I did mine by hand because my sewing machine is busted and I get a kind of Zen buzz from sewing by hand, but if you have a non-busted one I recommend that you use it as it will be MUCH EASIER. You’re going to be sewing everything with the nice side of the fabric facing in, then turning it inside out to stuff it.

THE ARMS: (To make a quilted pattern that looks like suckers, see this other post). Pin together one patterned fabric piece 1 and one felt piece 1 (with the nice sides facing the inside). Sew down around the U-shape and back up, leaving the top open. Then turn the arm inside out, stuff it (it’s easiest to do both of these things if you sort of scrunch it up like you’re trying to put on a pair of tights, excuse the non-dude-friendly reference) and sew the top closed. Do the same for the other seven arms and rejoice in the fact that this is the most tedious part. Same deal with the two long arms, they’re just harder to stuff.

THE FINS: Pin together two of your piece 4s and sew together the curvy outer edge. Turn the piece inside out, so the seam you just sewed is on the inside, and start sewing up the other side, stuffing gradually as you go along. You should end up with a triangle-ish puffy thing. Repeat for the other two piece 4s.

THE BODY: Put down one piece 3, then place the two fins you have down with the point up and the curvy side pointing in, then make a sandwich by putting the other piece 3 down on top. Pin it all together and sew around the edges with the two fins still inside, as shown. Turn it inside out and move on to…

THE HEAD: So take piece 6 and the ten arms you’ve already done. Lay the arms, fabric side facing you, out with the arms’ top seams in a line half an inch from the top of piece 6. The order should be arm arm arm arm BIG ARM arm arm arm arm BIG ARM. The legs should be almost entirely covering piece 6. Pin them in place and sew a straight line through the individual legs seams to attach the legs to piece 6.

When you pick up the other side of piece 6, you now have something resembling a really weird untied hula skirt. Sew together the two 9-inch ends of piece 6 with the fabric side of the arms on the outside, and keep it inside out for the moment.

PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: Fit the open end of the body through the arms (still fabric side facing out) and pull the edge all the way through the felt cylinder so it’s even with the edge that DOESN’T have arms attached to it. Sew around the diameters of the head cylinder and the body cylinder to attach them, then pull the legs down over the head and you’re almost done!

Stuff the body, then seal it off by sewing piece 5 over the open end (even if you do have a functional sewing machine, you’ll probably have to do this part by hand).

THE EYES: Sew the black circles on the white circles and whipstitch the eyes onto the head. You do this last because you can’t tell where they’re going to end up on the end product if you put them on before stuffing the body.